Aside

in time of daffodils (who know, e.e. cummings

13 Feb

in time of daffodils (who know, e.e. cummings.

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in time of daffodils (who know
the goal of living is to grow)
forgetting why,remember how...

in time of all sweet things beyond

in time of lilacs who proclaim
the aim of waking is to dream,
remember so(forgetting seem)..

in time of roses(who amaze
our now and here with paradise)
forgetting if,remember yes.

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.in time of all sweet things beyond
whatever mind may comprehend,.
remember seek(forgetting find).

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and in a mystery to be
(when time from time shall set us free)
forgetting me,remember me

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This post is a part of Word 4 Wednesday, TIME, which is hosted by the wonderful Garden Walk Garden Talk, a lovely blog which I encourage you to visit.  Other participating blogs include:

8. Timeless Remnants of Time

9. A Tale Of Two Gardens

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Attributions:
Poem by e.e. cummings
Photo taken by me durin yesterday’s trip to the Huntington Botanical Gardens.

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Huh? What Is That Your Rose Just Said?

3 Feb

 Victorian Language of FlowersMy garden sighs longingly with a heavy yearning that murmurs quietly up stems of faithfulness held straight and true by deep-rooted perseverance, and eases into tightly folded, pent-up buds.  From there it throws itself upon the windy strains of gossip floating amidst ivory magnolias (perseverance), nodding camellia (longing) and fragrant lemons blossoms (fidelity).

No, I have not been reading too many fortune cookies with rolled up paper slips foretelling my future!  I’m learning about Victorian gardens and culture, which was so modest and restrained that emotions were often communicated indirectly through symbolism, such as the  “language of flowers”.  Messages were encoded by choosing certain flowers to compose a bouquet.  Yet strangely, when I apply this language to the flowers in my garden, it tells a fairly accurate tale.  I do having longing, faithfulness and perseverance.  I long to bring several creative visions to fruition, a desire supported by deep roots of perseverance and devotion to my dreams, beliefs, ethics, family and friends.

So it might just be fun to see what the flowers and herbs you’ve chosen for your garden mean!  Are they warning of deceitful danger nearby? Proclaiming an exuberant “welcome“?  A “decoder”  list of their Victorian meanings resides at Wikipedia: Language of Flowers.  At least it could save you from mistakenly sending a bouquet claiming undying love. Conversely, if you do want to send one this Valentine’s day, you’ll know how!

A few examples:

nuts – stupidity (perhaps the origin of the phrase “he/she’s nuts”?)

verbena – pray for me

clematis – ingenuity

marjoram – happiness

bluebell – humility, gratitude

wisteria – welcome

violet – let’s take a chance on happiness

Rest On One’s Oars

20 Jan

Winter comforts: a snug room, the crackle and smell of a wood fire, amber candle flames, stacks of good books to read.  While the earth sighs in winter, drawing in upon itself, it is good to “rests on one’s oars” too.

Rest on one’s oars:  To relax after strenuous exertion; to suspend one’s efforts temporarily…Often this boating phrase is extended to mean…relying on the momentum of past performance to carry one along.   Rest on one’s oars was used literally in the early 18th century, and figuratively shortly thereafter.  From Picturesque Expressions: A Thematic Dictionary.

Gathered pine cones carry the seeds of the next chapter, foreshadowing spring’s fragrant new pines.

More comforts: a soft couch with plentiful pillows, thick, cozy throws, and dreaming dogs curled up fast asleep, legs twitching as they run in soft summer meadows.  Excuse me, I think I’ll curl up myself and rest on my oars for just a bit now.

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